Benefits of a professional bike fit

Optimising the rider’s position on the bicycle to maximise power, efficiency and aerodynamics while reducing stress and strains on the body and overuse injuries.

What to Expect

A professional bike fit is usually two to three hour session that includes:

  1. An interview to gather information on the rider’s goals, training load, medical history and current aches/pains/discomfort/concerns.
  2. A functional assessment of the rider’s flexibility/core strength/stability and an evaluation of the feet and cycling equipment.
  3. An on bike evaluation of the rider’s position.Incremental modifications are then made to the bike find the personal position for the rider to suit their style and constraints to maximise efficiency, power and comfort.

Tools and technology are used during a bike fit, but the quality of the fit depends more on the training and skill level of the fitter more than the technology used.

Every rider has has different needs so no two riders have the same position.

Your Personal Fit Coordinates
(Road vs TT/Triathlon position)

At the end of a professional bike fit you should always ride away with Your Personal Fit Coordinates as they are the minimum information you will need to replicate your position again in the future.

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Saddle Height:
This is measured from the centre of the bottom bracket to the top of the saddle (measured at the mid point of the saddle, halfway between the tip and the tail).Saddle Fore/Aft:
This is the horizontal distance from the nose of the saddle to the centre bottom bracket.
For road bikes the saddle nose will typically be behind the bottom bracket.
For the same rider, the saddle on a tri/TT bike will be further forward than a road bike with the saddle nose close to the bottom bracket, maybe even in front of the bottom bracket.

(Note: for a UCI legal TT position, your saddle must be a minimum of 50mm behind the bottom bracket).

Handlebar reach:
Road:

  1. Saddle nose to the center of the handlebar clamp (Measured as a straight line between the nose of the saddle to the center of the handlebar)
  2. Saddle nose to the back of the hoods (Measured as a straight line between the nose of the saddle to the back of the hood).

Tri/TT:

  1. Saddle nose to the back of the armrest
  2. Saddle nose to the shifter pivot point

Handlebar elevation:
Road – the vertical distance from the top of the saddle to the top of the handlebars.
Tri/TT – the vertical distance from the top of the saddle to the top of the armrest.

You should also note your saddle model, handlebar type (reach & drop), components (Shimano/Campy/SRAM), crank length, pedal make and even shoes worn for the fit as they are all taken into account to get to your optimal position.